I’m on TV today with Human Remains—and my first grader directed the cameras!

I was racing out the door for a television interview about my forthcoming book, Human Remains. My daughter, Anastasia, hopped off my husband’s lap. “I want to come with you.”

“Oh. I’m already late—”

“I want to come with you.”

My husband could look after her. That was the sensible option. Instead, reaching for my keys, I said, “Okay. Are you wearing clothes?”

“Yes.”

“Let’s go.”

We made it to CogecoTV with ten minutes to spare. I buzzed for entry. I’d already reminded Anastasia, “What are you going to do during my interview?”

“Play with my animals.” She’d brought tiny toy animals.

“And how are you going to do it?”

“Making no noise.”

This was dicey. Her brother, Max, understands rules and when his mother is not fooling around. Anastasia is more like what one of my rural neighbours said: everyone has one kid who has to pee on the electric fence.

And you never know how people are going to react to children. Most people claim to like kids, but as soon as you tow a small body into the room, just watch their face fall and their body language go on high alert.

I did it anyway. I think part of it is being a doctor; I’m separated from my kids more than with an average job. If they want to come with me, I bring ’em.

To my astonishment, everyone at the station took to Anastasia. The producer, Bill Makinson, showed her around the station and told her she could help him press the buttons for the cameras during my interview with the lovely Brenda St-Louis about Human Remains.

Bill told me afterward, “Anastasia figured it out. We use the wide angle if you’re both talking and switch to the other camera if you’re taking turns. She knew what to do. She can read really well.”

What? My six-year-old knows more about behind-the-scenes TV production than I do!

They even fired up the bingo machine at the end for her. She solemnly plucked each ball out and said, for example, “O 29.”

I love taking risks and having it turn out better than if I’d played it safe.

Human Remains will debut April 25th, DNA Day. If you’re in Cornwall, come on out to the library at 7 p.m. I’ll have DNA origami, an interview with stem cell scientist Dr. Bill Stanford, and the coolest people turning up—except for the Ottawa, Montreal, and Williamstown launches, of course! Thanks to the Review and Standard Freeholder for getting the word out. You can preorder it the e-book for only $2.99!

I know some of you have kindly agreed to review Human Remains. Thanks to those who have done the deed on GoodreadsAmazon changed the rules and won’t allow reviews on pre-orders, so thank you so much for your patience. Amazon reviews should open up on Tuesday, April 25th.

I should also have a special promo code for you on DNA Day, so please join my mailing list here.

In the meantime, tune in at I’m participating in this gnarly promo with other mystery authors today at http://annertan.com/free/ (yes, I’m last-minute. Did you miss the part about how I was almost late for my own interview?)

Tune in to Cogeco’s Community Matters today, which is Tuesday, April 18th, at 17:30, 18:00, 22:00, 22:30. This is bingo night!

Tomorrow, watch us all over again at 09:30, 17:30, 18:00, 22:00, and 22:30.

And then come celebrate science and literature with me!

Cheers,

Melissa

Buy Local: R&L’s Book Nook

I’m sold out of Stockholm Syndrome for the moment (yeah! Fist punch! Running man dance move! Wish I’d had another one for Melissa B), so now it’s time to turn the spotlight on our hard-working local stores. ‘Cause I, for one, basically haven’t done my shopping yet.youth-570881_640

Kobo director Mark Leslie Lefebvre first suggested I reach out to my local bookstores when Terminally Ill (Hope Sze #3) got traction. I felt shy, since I used to be a shy kid until I trained myself to be more extroverted. But I took a deep breath and called R&L’s Book Nook, the only bookstore in Alexandria.

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Even though this photo is blurry, it has the most genuine smiles, because the photo-taker said, “Say ‘sex’!” I replied, “Are you French?” She lowered the camera to say, “Yes.” “I knew it! French people talk about sex all the time.” French Canadians, anyway. Not sure about France-French.

Roena and Loretta, the R&L who own the store, were lovely. Someone had already asked for Terminally Ill based on my CBC Ontario Morning interview, so they took the Hope Sze series, as well as all my other books. They hosted the my Books and Bodies event in September 2014 (belly dancing pic with Joseline Beaulieu below), and made a huge window display with a dancing skeleton in my scrubs in honour of the event (Terminally Ill=skeleton, Student Body=dancing). I can’t find the pics right now, but trust me, it was spectacular and an author’s dream come true.

They make their own gingerbread and sell crafts, used books and new books, including books by local authors like Jennifer Debruin.

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They make gingerbread, too. Houses, cookies, and lollipops. So all you non-readers but eaters, start salivating now.

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Books & bodies with Joseline Beaulieu, Sept 2014

So get thee to R&L Book Nook! You can park at Gaetan’s Chip Stand and fill your mind and body with literature, gingerbread, and French fries!

 

 

 

 

 

 

As an aside: an hour ago, Pat Larkin bought my fifth-last trade paperback of Stockholm Syndrome. In fact, he bought the entire set for his daughter, Amy, a vet student in Calgary.

IMG_9307 Pat really went the extra mile here. He couldn’t get the Hope books in Williamstown, so he contacted me through my website. Then we played telephone tag until Amy flew back to Calgary. But Pat still drove to my house today, theoretically on his way to Cornwall (which is the other way), bought the entire series, and then inspected my electrical wiring and generator to give me tips on how to get my house wired up properly in case of another ice storm. (Summary: I will probably set up an automatic generator in the New Year. Our generator is too small, and we need a transfer switch.)

It doesn’t get any better than that.

But if you go to R&L’s Book Nook, you can make up your own story. Hey, I was there twice yesterday.

As the French Canadians also say, Gogogogogogogo!

R&L’s Book Nook in Alexandria58 Alexandria Main/Alexandria, ON/K0C 1A0/(613)525-9940

rlbooknook@eastlink.ca

And I’m embedding the Cogeco interview because I wasn’t able to post it until late yesterday: