Bios for Melissa Yi/Yuan-Innes

2-line bio (140 characters): Melissa Yi is an emergency physician with an active practice and an award-winning writing career. www.melissayuaninnes.com

Short Bio (50 words):

Melissa Yi is an emergency physician and award-winning writer. In her newest crime novel, DEATH FLIGHT, Dr. Hope Sze battles murder on an airplane. Previous Hope Sze volumes were recommended by the Globe and Mail and CBC Books as best suspense novels of the season. http://www.melissayuaninnes.com/

Medium Bio (100 words):

Melissa Yi is an emergency physician and award-winning writer. In her newest crime novel, DEATH FLIGHT, Dr. Hope Sze boards an airplane with the love of her life—and a secret murderer. HUMAN REMAINS, the previous Hope Sze thriller, was recommended by The Globe and Mail, CBC Books, and The Next Chapter as one of the best Canadian suspense novels. Yi was shortlisted for the Derringer Award for the world’s best short mystery fiction. Under the name Melissa Yuan-Innes, she also writes medical humour and has won speculative fiction awards. http://www.melissayuaninnes.com/

Long Bio (400 words):

Melissa Yi is an emergency physician and award-winning writer. In her newest crime novel, DEATH FLIGHT, Dr. Hope Sze rejoins her true love in Los Angeles—but a murder on the flight home sends Hope scrambling to save lives at 35,000 feet while trapped on board with a patient, intelligent killer.

The Globe and Mail hailed HUMAN REMAINS, the previous Hope Sze novel, as one of the best Canadian suspense novels to read at the cottage, “a scarier-than-ever murder mystery.” Human Remains was also was the #1 mystery recommendation of CBC Books’ Holiday Gift Guide, followed by Maureen Jennings and Louise Penny.

Melissa was shortlisted for the Arthur Ellis Award for the best crime story in Canada and a finalist for the Derringer Award, which is awarded for the best short mystery fiction in the world. Her stories were published in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, Jewish Noir, and Montreal Noir, and will soon appear in Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine.

Melissa writes speculative fiction under her real name, Melissa Yuan-Innes. She won second place in Writers of the Future during medical school and appears in the Aurora Award-winning anthology The Dragon and the Stars anthology. Melissa branched into humour articles for the Medical Post, penning the popular collection THE MOST UNFEELING DOCTOR IN THE WORLD AND OTHER TRUE TALES FROM THE EMERGENCY ROOM. She continues to write across genres, including romance and two award-winning children’s books (MAX’S MAGIC HAT and POPCORN GIRL IN LIKE, as Melissa Yuan).

Melissa had the pleasure of appearing on CBC Radio several times, including syndicated interviews across the country, as far east as Newfoundland and Labrador, as far west as Prince George, and as far north as Whitehorse. CBC Radio also commissioned a radio drama pilot, CODE BLUES, inspired by the first Hope Sze novel. Melissa’s print interviews include The Review, The Standard Freeholder, the Glengarry News, Cornwall Living, The Seaway Valley News, and The Seeker. Melissa made her television debut on Rogers TV and TV Cogeco.

Doctor-wise, Melissa has worked as far north as Ivujivik, Quebec (Inuktitut: ᐃᕗᔨᕕᒃ, north of 60; also the northernmost village in a Canadian province). Nowadays she stays closer to home, running codes in Eastern Ontario. She’s cheerfully married to her high school sweetheart, with two loud and loveable children and a Rottweiler shepherd. She loves stories, yoga, blading, sustainable fashion, laughter, intelligence, and random craziness. She hangs out mostly on Facebook, with occasional forays as @dr_sassy on Twitter, and on her website, http://www.melissayuaninnes.com/.

 

Speaker Introduction (200 words):

Fiction (Melissa Yi):

Melissa Yi (pronounced YEE), also known as Dr. Melissa Yuan-Innes (pronounced EWAN INN-nes), studied emergency medicine at McGill University in Montreal. She was so shocked by the patients crammed into the waiting area, and the examining rooms without running water, that she began to contemplate murder. And so she created Dr. Hope Sze (TSE), the resident who could save lives and fight crime.  She’ll do her best to entertain and edify you today. Let’s give a warm welcome to Melissa Yi.

Non-Fiction (Dr. Melissa Yuan-Innes):

Dr. Melissa Yuan-Innes (pronounced EWAN INN-nes) applied to medical school mostly because she wants to save lives, but also because she’s nosy. Medicine is a fascinating and frustrating window into other people’s lives. She shares her sometimes painful, occasionally hilarious stories in The Medical Post, Chicken Soup for the Soul, and in her essay collections THE MOST UNFEELING DOCTOR IN THE WORLD AND OTHER TRUE TALES FROM THE EMERGENCY ROOM, FIFTY SHADES OF GREY’S ANATOMY, and BROKEN BONES. She also writes award-winning fiction, including her latest crime novel, HUMAN REMAINS. She appeared on CBC Radio’s Ontario Morning and recently had so many print interviews that an addiction services counsellor said, “I see you in the newspaper more often than I see you in the emergency room.” Please give a warm welcome to Melissa Yuan-Innes (pronounced EWAN INN-nes).

Medical (Dr. Melissa Yuan-Innes):

Dr. Melissa Yuan-Innes (pronounced EWAN INN-nes), M.D., CCFP-EM, M.O.T., is an emergency physician at the Cornwall Community Hospital, the Glengarry Memorial Hospital, and the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario. She has presented at the California Society of Plastic Surgeons and was first author on an article in Spine. Her latest release is a crime novel, DEATH FLIGHT. The M.O.T. stands for Mother Of Two. Please give a warm welcome to Melissa Yuan-Innes (pronounced EWAN INN-nes).

5 Fun Facts You Didn’t Know About Me:

1. I’ve tried throat-singing in Puvirnituk, Nunavik, Quebec.

2. I also did karate and ice-fished in Puvirnituk. Good times.

3. More recently, I tried contemporary dance and waacking.

4. I worry about Armageddon. Not zombies, but just running out of clean air and fresh water. So I try not to fly, to reduce my carbon footprint, even though I dream about travelling.

5. For two years, I gave my kids cardboard boxes for Christmas. There was stuff in the boxes, but the main presents were boxes for them to climb in, decorate, and use their imagination. The first year was more successful than the second.